Tuesday, July 25, 2006

South Carolina Student Retention Study Released

Here is the summary of a survey of 1,900 students from colleges throughout South Carolina conducted to understand how many of our college students plan to leave South Carolina after graduation and develop strategies to keep them in the state. View the Study.

4 comments:

Evan Tishuk said...

Wow. Very interesting information in there. That needs to be turned into a more online-friendly HTML / Flash presentation--Power Point slides are worse than openning a PDF in a browser.

Greenville Forward said...

Here's an easier to navigate version. I hope this works better.

http://www.greenvilleforward.com/Downloadable%20Files/SC%20Retention%20Survey%20Results.pdf

Anonymous said...

I don't quite see how *any* such study could be considered as representative of South Carolina as a whole unless USC had participated, and I am curious as to why their data is not included.

Nonetheless, this is interesting, though in some sense hardly surprising. If this is to be useful, then next year there needs to be a cross reference to other states, and students also need to be asked about their own reference points. Can they really be thinking that Columbia is "big" if they have been to Atlanta?

(I also think it would help in the "progressiveness" category if the presentation itself didn't have grammatical errors in it, but alas, this is South Carolina and literacy is not one of our strong points.)

Murray Brockman said...

I wonder what percentage of students in other states stay in those states after graduation. I vaguely recall data from North Carolina that noted about 55% of graduates of NC schools expected to stay in NC. While the difference of about 3-9% between SC and NC retention may be significant, I think the overwhelming message is that this population is mobile, independent of their particular home state, and that they probably view their mobility as inherently positive.

There is good news for us in that mobility. The overwhelming importance attached to "availability of jobs" means that talent from all over the world will come here as SC develops jobs.

Last comment: let's try to focus on the positive once in a while. All the surveys I have seen from other states use headlines like "Best predictor of state chosen for residence is the college attended". Then they note that something like half stay in state. Only is SC would we say "We lose over half!!!" I know it's difficult, but couldn't we see a half-full glass now and then? Remember the old management joke, "We will continue to fire people until morale improves."